Lacquer miniature painting on papier-mâché (“tosh-komoz”) is a kind of fine art that flourished in Samarkand in the epoch of Temurids, in the 14th-15th centuries. This is evidenced by genuine ornamental medallions of papier-mache, miraculously preserved in the interiors of the palaces of the “capital of the world.” By the 17th century, a school had been established, the master of the Middle Ages, Kamoliddin Behzod and Mahmoud Muzahib, gained special fame for their “small miracles”. Jewellery fine paintings covered the covers of manuscripts, tables of valuable wood, pencil cases (kalamdons), chess, caskets. The drawing was applied by brushes on the ground, which was prepared from a gold or bronze powder with the addition of cherry and apricot glue. Varnish and Lacquer painting. The chess colours used for papier-mache were prepared according to a very complex and varied recipe. Plots for miniature painting were inspired by the works of the great poets of the East of that time – Navoi, Jami, Furkat, Nizami, Khayyam, works of masters decorated with scenes of hunting and battles, images of folk customs and festivities. But internecine wars became the reason for forgetting the technologies and traditions of ancient crafts. Therefore, most of the works did not reach our days, and by the end of the XIX century, the secrets of the art of Uzbek miniature were lost.

Lacquer painting. Casket In the late 70’s. XX century in Uzbekistan, the revival of traditional lacquer painting on papier-mâché and the association of masters of folk art “Usto” was organized experimental research and production workshop of art painting, which was headed by the famous painter Ch. Akhmarov. Due to this, a school of miniatures was created in Uzbekistan. At the same time, the Department of Lacquer Miniature was opened in the Republican Art College, the Foundation for the Preservation, Development and Revival of Endangered Species of Folk Art was created the Lacquer miniature. uzikat.com is a great place where you can choose some Lacquer miniature.

Today, the lacquer miniature painting survives the Renaissance, a revival after more than a century of oblivion. Modern painters find their own style, carefully preserving the established in the centuries forms and principles. The works of Uzbek artists are presented to the visitors of many international exhibitions. Fine and thin lacquer miniature painting is a unique art and a display of the continuity of generations.